Thursday, 29 October 2015

Places still available! OISC Level 1 course, Saturday -Sunday 14 - 15 November, City of London, from a practicing OISC-accredited immigration company. CPD 10 hours accepted by the OISC.

Join us for this very informative and practical 2-day weekend course at our office in the City of London!  UK Immigration Rules, visas, switching, visas for spouses and partners, what a great idea for a weekend! Or perhaps you would enjoy learning about British Citizenship or Points-Based System, EU/EEA applications and European law? 

1st 4Immigration Ltd is a practicing OISC-accredited immigration company, OISC ref F200800152. After many years of experience – and hundreds of successful cases – we are sharing our experience to help you to prepare for your OISC Level 1 assessment and accreditation or, if you are already practicing, to increase your knowledge. You can read
Testimonials on our immigration cases here.

TRAINING DATES:
  

Weekend 14 - 15 November 2015 (in time for OISC exam on 23 November).

Weekend 12 - 13 December 2015 (in time for OISC exam on 17 December).


Weekend 30 - 31 January 2016 (in time for OISC exam on 1 March).

Our tutors are our very own OISC-accredited practicing immigration advisers who handle the real cases during the week and teach on weekends. You can read about them on the Tutors page.

Unlike most traditional courses, ours is conducted using plain language and does not simply contain quotes from the Immigration Rules. We include cases studies from our practice, answers to most common questions, a Questions&Answers session and a mock Level 1 assessment, which is given to the candidates at the end to complete in their own time and send to us. Generally, we try to keep it as entertaining as possible. We will also provide a printed version of the course (150 pages) for you to take home, which is very detailed, contains more cases studies and you can take it with you to the 'real' OISC exam.
To book visit our training website: http://www.1st4immigration.com/training/classroom-oisc-level-1-course.php

Detailed Course Agenda can be found here and is designed in our own unique way.

1st 4Immigration Ltd: 68 King William Street, City of London, London, EC4N 7DZ. Near Monument underground station. Email: training@1st4immigration.com, Phone: 0871 472 1468 (£0.13 per minute plus your provider's access charge, emails are free).
_____________________________________________________

You can find a detailed Table of Contents on the link above, here are 2 examples (of 20):
PART 1: CRUCIAL TO GET THE BASICS!2 systems of immigration law: UK law and European law | Types of visas under the UK law | Entry Clearance | Visitor visa | Leave to Remain (also called Residence Permit or Limited Leave to Remain) | Indefinite Leave to Remain (ILR) | It is possible to lose an ILR, however Indefinite it is | Indefinite Leave to Enter | There is also a Leave to Enter
‘Settlement’ and 2 confusing meanings of this word | Common question:  Passport has expired, do I have to transfer my visa to a new passport | What is Switching? | Common examples when switching is not allowed even though the migrants are desperate to do so | What is the Date of Application and why it is so important? | When is the Date of Application? | In-time and Out-of-time applications

 

PART 2: IMMIGRATION RULES AND HOW TO USE THEM
Each category rules consist of 3 parts | My ‘Other way around’ principle | How to determine if switching is possible?| How to determine if a visa allows to work? | Registration with the police | Tuberculosis test | UKBA Staff Guidance
You can find Extracts on the link above too, here are 2 of them:

 

Extract from the “IMMIGRATION RULES AND HOW TO USE THEM” section:
No one knows everything and remembers all the rules! The trick is to know how to use the Immigration Rules and where to find  the specific information. The Rules may change anytime, and they do change a lot, but if you know how to use the Rules you could check the requirements or check the changes at any time. For example, things like whether a migrant can switch a visa category while in the UK or whether a migrant can work or whether a particular English test is acceptable are all a matter of the Rules, not a matter of guessing.
My ‘Other way around’ principle:
I call it ‘other way around’ because many people tend to think this way: “I am on a Tier 5 visa and want to know if I can apply for a Spouse visa inside the UK”, then they go on the Immigration Rules webpage for the Tier 5 category and try to read the rules there. Understandably, they only find the rules about how to get a Tier 5 visa, which they already have, and not a Spouse visa.
What you need to do is to act the ‘other way around’, ie to check the rules of the category your client is looking to apply for, not the rules of the category in which he/she already has a visa. In our example of switching from a Tier 5 to a Spouse visa it is the Spouse visa rules that one needs to read – to determine if he/she can qualify.

 

Extracts from the “CRUCIAL TO GET THE BASICS!” section:
What is Switching?
Switchingis not an official term. Switching simply means changing a visa category while inside the UK, ie switching from one to another, such as from a Tier 4 Student to a Tier 2 General; or from Tier 4 to a Spouse visa. Officially it is called ‘applying for a leave to remain in a Tier 2 General category’ or ‘applying for a leave to remain as a Spouse of a UK citizen’. So, we can simply say ‘Switching from a Student visa to a Spouse visa’.
The significance of switching is this: switching means applying inside the UK and it is only allowed if the Rules specifically allow so. If switching is not allowed then the applicant has to return to their country and apply for a visa from there, which means he/she would be applying for an Entry Clearance.

What is the Date of Application and why it is so important?
Imagine this: you are making an application today but tomorrow the Rules are changing, which rules would apply? Or you have made an application a month ago, your visa expires in 2 weeks time and your application is not going to be decided before then, are you going to become an overstayer through no fault of your own?

A Date of Application idea deals with such issues. If the date of your application is before the Rules changed then your application is going to be considered under the Rules in place before the changes. For example, Spouse/Partner visas rules were significantly changed on 9 July 2012, yet those who applied before that, even on 8 July 2012, had their applications considered under the old rules, even if the decision was made a few months after the rules changed.
If the date of your application is before your last visa expired then your status remains the same as it was on the date of application for as long as it takes for a new application to be considered. However long it takes, even if the last visa expired by then. Officially it is extended by virtue of section 3C of the Immigration Act 1971, which automatically extends the ‘last visa’ for as long as it is going to take for a decision on the new application. This means migrants do not become overstayers through no fault of their own?

 

Fast Same-day UK passport renewal for autumn and Christmas / New Year travel! Submission on the same or next working day in London. Renewal, replacement of lost passport. Also 2nd valid passport for frequent business travellers.

Multi Travel Visas Ltd can assist with renewing a UK passport using same-day or 1 week service at the Passport Office in London, with the authorisation from you as per the government requirements. We can submit applications on next working day after receiving your documents, there is no need to wait for an appointment. We may also be able to submit on the same day if we receive your documents before 12pm (midday) and they are in order.

We can also help if for some reason you are unable to apply yourself. If you don't have time to travel to a Passport Office yourself we can apply on your behalf (you don't have to come to London). If you are living/working abroad you can courier documents to our London office and we can submit them promptly for same-day service. This includes if your passport has run out of pages or if you need to renew not only yours but also/or your child's passport urgently.  Example: British expats living or working in the USA, the Middle East, Asia and Europe.  

Passport renewal: we can renew your adult passport on same-day service or 1 week service, with applications submitted as soon as next working day. We can also submit on same working day if we have document before 12pm and they are in order. You can also ask for a ‘Jumbo’ passport (48 pages instead of the standard 32), handy if you travel frequently outside the UK and your passport is full of stamps – it will take much longer for your passport to run out of pages.

Replacement of a lost or stolen passport: we can submit promptly, as above, but replacements are only processed on 1 week service at the Passport Office.

2nd valid passport for frequent business travellers: this is possible within the timing of normal urgent services, here your employer has to provide a letter confirming you have to travel frequently for work and you need a 2nd passport to travel while your 1st one is used to apply for visas.

We also help with foreign travel visas: Russia (including invitations, ie visa support), China, India, Saudi Arabia, Kazakhstan and others. If you have a British passport but work abroad we can still process a visa application here in London. For example, if you are working abroad far from a capital city in that country, and cannot go to the Embassies, then you could courier your documents to us and we’d submit to the Embassies in the UK. Example: British expats working in the Spanish islands of Majorca.


 Contact us now: 0871 472 1468. Email info@multitravelvisas.co.uk , we reply on the same working day! Web-site: http://www.multitravelvisas.co.uk/same-day-british-passport-renewal.php  with the visa requirements and clients' feedbacks. Calls to 0871 number cost £0.10 per minute, emails are free.

Our office is based in the City of London, near Monument station. Also close Bank, Liverpool Street and London Bridge. Within easy reach by DLR from Canary Wharf. 

New testimonial on fast same-day UK passport renewal, from a British national residing in Singapore.

“Hello Harpreet, the passport(s) arrived this morning and all in good order. Thank you all for an excellent service and job well done. It certainly is a much better way of renewing a passport from overseas and not having the trouble of a 6-8 week wait. Thanks again and best regards.”

This came from Nigel, a British citizen residing in Singapore, after he received his brand new passport delivered by DHL, following an application for same-day service which we have submitted on Nigel’s behalf. It is possible to renew a British passport within just 2-3 working days! It is actually same-day service at the UK Passport Office, so with an appointment available as soon as on the next working day the whole process is very fast. And if we have your documents by 12pm, and they are in order (or if you quickly arrange them to be in order, such as to bring new photos), then we can submit on the same working day!


Phone 0871 472 1468 or 07795471483
Email:
info@multitravelvisas.co.uk 

Or come to our office from 9am to 6pm (you don’t need an appointment): 68 King William Street, City of London, London, EC4N 7DZ. We’re near Monument tube station, close to Bank and Liverpool Street, over the bridge from London Bridge station and within easy reach by DLR from Canary Wharf.

Saturday, 24 October 2015

Fast Schengen visa for autumn and Christmas / New Year travel and sooner appointments! Turnaround 4 working days for most nationals. We reply emails on the same working day! Tel 0871 472 1468

Multi Travel Visas Ltd is an accredited agency with the official French visa centre in London, we have many years of experience of working with French Consulate. We use a separate system of appointments and can provide an appointment sooner than available for the public.

FRENCH SCHENGEN VISA:

It is possible to obtain a visa within 4 working days from the date of the biometric appointment for most nationals, such as Filipino, South African, Russian, Indian, Chinese, Turkish and most others. It takes longer for some nationals, up to 3 weeks, a list is available on our website: http://www.multitravelvisas.co.uk/schengen-visa-france.php 

GERMAN SCHENGEN VISA:

German Schengen visa takes 5 working days from the date of appointment. No biometrics, no personal attendance needed! Furthermore, spouses and family members of UK/EU citizens don't have to book tickets/accommodation before applying for this visa. This is the best Embassy to apply for a Schengen visa for spouses and family members of UK/EU citizens.
Webpage: http://www.multitravelvisas.co.uk/schengen-visa-germany.php

PORTUGUESE SCHENGEN VISA:
Portuguese Schengen visa takes 1 week from ta Wednesday. No biometrics, no personal attendance needed! Webpage: http://www.multitravelvisas.co.uk/schengen-visa-portugal.php


Contact us at Multi Travel Visas: www.multitravelvisas.co.uk
Phone 0871 472 1468 or 07795471483
Email:
info@multitravelvisas.co.uk 

We reply on the same working day!

Or come to our office from 9am to 6pm (you don’t need an appointment): 68 King William Street, City of London, London, EC4N 7DZ. We’re near Monument tube station, close to Bank and Liverpool Street, over the bridge from London Bridge station and within easy reach by DLR from Canary Wharf.

New testimonial on our German Schengen visa service. No biometrics, no personal attendance needed (no trip to London).

"Epic, great news, thanks Sebastian. You, guys, have done a great job, I will definitely use your service again in the future and not hesitate to recommend you on. Many thanks.”

These lovely words came from Mikey, who applied for a German Schengen visa through us in London. It is possible to obtain a German Schengen visa within 4 working days from the date of appointment for most nationals, such as South African, Thai, Filipino, Russian, Indian, Chinese and most others. We can also assist with a French and Portuguese Schengen visas.

The good thing about applying through German Embassy is there are no biometrics (fingerprints) and there is no need for the applicants to attend a visa centre in London. We do it for you! Plus spouses of UK/EU citizens still do not need to submit tickets and hotel/accommodation booking (unlike when applying to French or Portuguese Embassies).

Contact us at Multi Travel Visas:




Same-day UK passport renewal without waiting for an appointment (next-day or same-day submission to the Passport Office in London): http://www.multitravelvisas.co.uk/same-day-british-passport-renewal.php

Website homepage with all services: http://www.multitravelvisas.co.uk
Phone 0871 472 1468 or 07795471483
Email:
info@multitravelvisas.co.uk  We reply on the same working day!

Or come to our office from 9am to 6pm (you don’t need an appointment): 68 King William Street, City of London, London, EC4N 7DZ. We’re near Monument tube station, close to Bank and Liverpool Street, over the bridge from London Bridge station and within easy reach by DLR from Canary Wharf.

Thursday, 22 October 2015

What is the difference between ‘born British’ and ‘not British at birth but can be registered’?

‘Born British’ means you are a British citizen at birth and can just apply for a UK passport (passport book).

Registration means applying to the Home Office immigration department to be accepted as a British citizen, having met the specified requirements by law (ie it can’t be done by everyone), paying a fee (currently main fee £749), submitting the required supporting documents, waiting for a decision and then, if it’s successful, being given an official certificate (Certificate of Registration). Only after this can you apply to the Passport Office for a UK passport (passport book).
 
We also have a post about children and grandchildren born abroad to British expats: http://1st4immigration-visas.blogspot.pt/2015/10/children-born-outside-uk-to-british.html
Another post is on ‘other way around’ situations, when a child is born in the UK to foreign parents: http://1st4immigration-visas.blogspot.co.uk/2015/04/why-are-some-parents-being-told-your.html
Furthermore, our most popular ever post Child born in the UK: http://1st4immigration-visas.blogspot.co.uk/2012/08/child-born-in-uk-does-heshe-need-visa.html
And if you didn’t know that before 1983 only British men (but not women) could pass their nationality to the children, you may this post interesting, particularly if you were born before 1983 to a British mother and are still not British. You may be able to register now. This is a testimonial from a client who has done it through us and the post also describes how it works: http://1st4immigration-visas.blogspot.pt/2014/10/new-successful-case-and-testimonial-on_27.html
For an individual advice or to make your application as successful please contact us: info@1st4immigration.com , we reply on the same working day. Or visit www.1st4immigration.com
 

 

Children born outside the UK to British expats: are they British? Prepare to be surprised by the world of “British Nationality law”.

If you are one of the lucky Brits who are living or working in, say, New Zealand or America, what happens if you have a child born while you are there? You may think “Of course they are British because I am British!” Most Brits don’t think too much about it and just apply for their child’s passport to HM Passport Office (via the process for those residing outside the UK). Here we make your life a bit more complicated and explain what nationality law thinks about it.

A child born abroad to a British parent is only British (as ‘born and British at birth’) if one of the parents is ‘British otherwise than by descent’. Examples of 'British otherwise than by descent': born in the UK to a British parent(s), born in the UK before 1983 to parents of any nationality (after this the law stopped automatic acquisition of nationality based on the place of birth, unlike, say, in America). You are also ‘British otherwise than by descent’ if you have naturalised, such as you came from India, worked here for 5 years, acquired permanent residency and at some point applied to naturalise as a British citizen. 

In this case a parent, who was ‘British otherwise than by descent’ when the child was born,  can pass their British nationality to a child born either in the UK or outside the UK. So, if you are a British-born UK citizen, then your child is born in, say, New Zealand, is also British.  

The catch is that your child in this example will be ‘British by descent’. It does not make any difference for your child and you should apply for his/her passport to the Passport Office: https://www.gov.uk/overseas-passports

It gets more interesting when it comes to your child’s child  (your grandchild). Your child will only be able to pass his/her British citizenship to your grandchildren born in the UK. If your grandchild is born outside the UK, he/she won’t be British! For example, your child is born in New Zeeland is British because you are a British-born UK citizen (most common scenario) is ‘British by descent’, so your grandchildren will only be British if they are born in the UK.

If you are in a situation where your child is not British at birth, because you are ‘British by descent’ then there is a way of registering a child to become British. A very common scenario we have is a British citizen born in South Africa to a parent who was born in the UK. In this case a Brit born in South Africa is ‘British by descent’. This person now asks us how their children can obtain British passports and we say they are not British citizens but in some cases the child can be registered to become British.  

The main 2 conditions for such registration are:

1)     To do it before the child turns 18years old. After that the child is ‘on his own’.

2)     To prove that a British parent (the one who was born in South Africa in this example) had resided in the UK for continuous 3 years at any point before the child was born.
If the two above, plus some more minor, conditions are met, then you can register your child as British and then apply for a British passport.

 
What is the difference between ‘born British’ and ‘not British at birth but can be registered’? We have a separate post here: http://1st4immigration-visas.blogspot.pt/2015/10/what-is-difference-between-born-british.html

Another post is on ‘other way around’ situations, when a child is born in the UK to foreign parents: http://1st4immigration-visas.blogspot.co.uk/2015/04/why-are-some-parents-being-told-your.html
Furthermore, our most popular ever post Child born in the UK: http://1st4immigration-visas.blogspot.co.uk/2012/08/child-born-in-uk-does-heshe-need-visa.html
 
And if you didn’t know that before 1983 only British men (but not women) could pass their nationality to the children, you may this post interesting, particularly if you were born before 1983 to a British mother and are still not British. You may be able to register now. This is a testimonial from a client who has done it through us and the post also describes how it works: http://1st4immigration-visas.blogspot.pt/2014/10/new-successful-case-and-testimonial-on_27.html

For an individual advice or to make your application as successful please contact us: info@1st4immigration.com , we reply on the same working day. Or visit www.1st4immigration.com

Monday, 19 October 2015

New successful case and testimonial for a UK Spouse visa, entry clearance from Morocco, for a husband of a British citizen.

“Hi Joanne, my husband received his settlement visa this morning, thank you so much for your assistance and please thank Lucy as well. We are both so happy.

This came from Natasha, a British citizen who asked us for help to secure a Spouse visa for her husband in Morocco. In this case we used Natasha’s employment in the UK to meet the Financial Requirement, as her salary was meeting the £18,600 threshold required for this type of visa.

The next step will be to renew a visa after 2.5 years and then to apply for permanent residency after 5 years. Both steps can be done using same-day service, such as the one we use in Croydon.
If you find it difficult to qualify for a Spouse / Partner visa because of the Financial Requirement, you may find this article useful (plus a few similar ones on our blog): http://1st4immigration-visas.blogspot.co.uk/2015/09/solution-for-margaret-on-how-to-secure.html   and this one of who is exempt from the £18,600 threshold: http://1st4immigration-visas.blogspot.co.uk/2015/08/who-is-exempt-from-financial.html  . We also have a ‘student issue’ here for those couples who are students or where a British partner is a student: http://1st4immigration-visas.blogspot.co.uk/2015/09/student-issue-who-has-to-meet-financial.html

For an individual advice or to make your application as successful please contact us: info@1st4immigration.com or visit www.1st4immigration.com 

To read about our OISC-accredited adviser Joanne Wilson, as well as our other advisers, please visit this page: http://www.1st4immigration.com/about.php#advisers

If you are an Immigration Adviser or a Solicitor please visit our immigration Training and CPD website: www.1st4immigration.com/training We have OISC Level 1 course (online and classroom) as well as a Spouse Visa – Case Studies & FAQs course, all CPD-accredited.
 

Monday, 12 October 2015

Join us for OISC Level 1 course, Saturday -Sunday 24 - 25 October (just in time for the OISC exam on 29 October), City of London, from a practicing immigration company. CPD 10 hours accepted by the OISC.

UK Immigration Rules, visas, switching, visas for spouses and partners, what a great idea for a weekend! Or perhaps you would enjoy learning about British Citizenship or Points-Based System or maybe even EU/EEA applications and European law? 

This is a very informative and practical 2-day weekend course at our office in the City of London!  1st 4Immigration Ltd is a practicing OISC-accredited immigration company, OISC ref F200800152. After many years of experience – and hundreds of successful cases – we are sharing our experience to help you to prepare for your OISC Level 1 assessment and accreditation or, if you are already practicing, to increase your knowledge. You can read Testimonials on our immigration cases here.

TRAINING DATES:
  
Weekend 24 - 25 October 2015 (in time for OISC exam on 29 October).

Weekend 14 - 15 November 2015 (in time for OISC exam on 23 November).

Weekend 12 - 13 December 2015 (in time for OISC exam on 17 December).

Weekend 30 - 31 January 2016 (in time for OISC exam on 1 March).

Our tutors are our very own OISC-accredited practicing immigration advisers who handle the real cases during the week and teach on weekends. You can read about them on the Tutors page.

Unlike most traditional courses, ours is conducted using plain language and does not simply contain quotes from the Immigration Rules. We include cases studies from our practice, answers to most common questions, a Questions&Answers session and a mock Level 1 assessment, which is given to the candidates at the end to complete in their own time and send to us. Generally, we try to keep it as entertaining as possible. We will also provide a printed version of the course (150 pages) for you to take home, which is very detailed, contains more cases studies and you can take it with you to the 'real' OISC exam.
To book visit our training website: http://www.1st4immigration.com/training/classroom-oisc-level-1-course.php

Detailed Course Agenda can be found here and is designed in our own unique way.

1st 4Immigration Ltd: 68 King William Street, City of London, London, EC4N 7DZ. Near Monument underground station. Email: training@1st4immigration.com, Phone: 0871 472 1468 (£0.13 per minute plus your provider's access charge, emails are free).
_____________________________________________________

You can find a detailed Table of Contents on the link above, here are 2 examples (of 20):
PART 1: CRUCIAL TO GET THE BASICS!2 systems of immigration law: UK law and European law | Types of visas under the UK law | Entry Clearance | Visitor visa | Leave to Remain (also called Residence Permit or Limited Leave to Remain) | Indefinite Leave to Remain (ILR) | It is possible to lose an ILR, however Indefinite it is | Indefinite Leave to Enter | There is also a Leave to Enter
‘Settlement’ and 2 confusing meanings of this word | Common question:  Passport has expired, do I have to transfer my visa to a new passport | What is Switching? | Common examples when switching is not allowed even though the migrants are desperate to do so | What is the Date of Application and why it is so important? | When is the Date of Application? | In-time and Out-of-time applications

PART 2: IMMIGRATION RULES AND HOW TO USE THEM
Each category rules consist of 3 parts | My ‘Other way around’ principle | How to determine if switching is possible?| How to determine if a visa allows to work? | Registration with the police | Tuberculosis test | UKBA Staff Guidance
You can find Extracts on the link above too, here are 2 of them:

Extract from the “IMMIGRATION RULES AND HOW TO USE THEM” section:
No one knows everything and remembers all the rules! The trick is to know how to use the Immigration Rules and where to find  the specific information. The Rules may change anytime, and they do change a lot, but if you know how to use the Rules you could check the requirements or check the changes at any time. For example, things like whether a migrant can switch a visa category while in the UK or whether a migrant can work or whether a particular English test is acceptable are all a matter of the Rules, not a matter of guessing.
My ‘Other way around’ principle:
I call it ‘other way around’ because many people tend to think this way: “I am on a Tier 5 visa and want to know if I can apply for a Spouse visa inside the UK”, then they go on the Immigration Rules webpage for the Tier 5 category and try to read the rules there. Understandably, they only find the rules about how to get a Tier 5 visa, which they already have, and not a Spouse visa.
What you need to do is to act the ‘other way around’, ie to check the rules of the category your client is looking to apply for, not the rules of the category in which he/she already has a visa. In our example of switching from a Tier 5 to a Spouse visa it is the Spouse visa rules that one needs to read – to determine if he/she can qualify.

Extracts from the “CRUCIAL TO GET THE BASICS!” section:
What is Switching?
Switchingis not an official term. Switching simply means changing a visa category while inside the UK, ie switching from one to another, such as from a Tier 4 Student to a Tier 2 General; or from Tier 4 to a Spouse visa. Officially it is called ‘applying for a leave to remain in a Tier 2 General category’ or ‘applying for a leave to remain as a Spouse of a UK citizen’. So, we can simply say ‘Switching from a Student visa to a Spouse visa’.
The significance of switching is this: switching means applying inside the UK and it is only allowed if the Rules specifically allow so. If switching is not allowed then the applicant has to return to their country and apply for a visa from there, which means he/she would be applying for an Entry Clearance.
What is the Date of Application and why it is so important?
Imagine this: you are making an application today but tomorrow the Rules are changing, which rules would apply? Or you have made an application a month ago, your visa expires in 2 weeks time and your application is not going to be decided before then, are you going to become an overstayer through no fault of your own?
A Date of Application idea deals with such issues. If the date of your application is before the Rules changed then your application is going to be considered under the Rules in place before the changes. For example, Spouse/Partner visas rules were significantly changed on 9 July 2012, yet those who applied before that, even on 8 July 2012, had their applications considered under the old rules, even if the decision was made a few months after the rules changed.
If the date of your application is before your last visa expired then your status remains the same as it was on the date of application for as long as it takes for a new application to be considered. However long it takes, even if the last visa expired by then. Officially it is extended by virtue of section 3C of the Immigration Act 1971, which automatically extends the ‘last visa’ for as long as it is going to take for a decision on the new application. This means migrants do not become overstayers through no fault of their own?