Friday, 28 November 2014

OISC Level 1 course, Sat-Sun 6-7 December, City of London (Monument), from a practicing immigration company. Plus date for the next 6 months - we have training every month.

2-day weekend courses, every month, at our office in the City of London. Multi Travel Visas Ltd and a sister company, 1st 4Immigration Ltd, are both accredited by The OISC, ref F201100418 and F200800152 respectively. After many years of experience – and hundreds of successful cases – we are offering to share our experience with you to help you prepare for your OISC Level 1 assessment and accreditation. You can read Testimonials on our immigration cases here.

TRAINING DATES (we have a class every month):

Weekend 6 - 7 December 2014 – book now!

Weekend 31 January - 1 February 2015

Weekend 28 February - 1 March 2015

Weekend 21 - 22 March 2015

Weekend 11 - 12 April 2015

Weekend 16 - 17 May 2015

Weekend 27 - 28 June 2015


Our tutors are our very own OISC-accredited practicing immigration advisers who handle the real cases during the week and teach on weekends. You can read about them on the Tutors page.


Unlike most traditional courses, ours is conducted using plain language and does not simply contain quotes from the Immigration Rules. We include cases studies from our practice, answers to most common questions, a Questions&Answers session and a mock Level 1 assessment, which is given to the candidates at the end to complete in their own time and send to us. Generally, we try to keep it as entertaining as possible. We will also provide a printed version of the course (150 pages) for you to take home, which is very detailed, contains more cases studies and you can take it with you to the 'real' OISC exam.


To book visit our training website: http://www.mtv-training.co.uk/


Detailed Course Agenda can be found here and is designed in our own unique way.





Online OISC Level 1 course (as opposed to classroom training): you can instantly download from this link and study in your own time.

Multi Travel Visas Ltd: 68 King William Street, City of London, London, EC4N 7DZ. Near Monument underground station. Email: info@mtv-training.co.uk , Phone: 0871 472 1468 (£0.10 per minute, emails are free).
 
_________________________________________________________________________________You can find a detailed Table of Contents on the link above, here are 2 examples (of 20):

PART 1: CRUCIAL TO GET THE BASICS!2 systems of immigration law: UK law and European law | Types of visas under the UK law | Entry Clearance | Visitor visa | Leave to Remain (also called Residence Permit or Limited Leave to Remain) | Indefinite Leave to Remain (ILR) | It is possible to lose an ILR, however Indefinite it is | Indefinite Leave to Enter | There is also a Leave to Enter
Settlement’ and 2 confusing meanings of this word | Common question:  Passport has expired, do I have to transfer my visa to a new passport | What is Switching? | Common examples when switching is not allowed even though the migrants are desperate to do so | What is the Date of Application and why it is so important? | When is the Date of Application? | In-time and Out-of-time applications

PART 2: IMMIGRATION RULES AND HOW TO USE THEM
Each category rules consist of 3 parts | My ‘Other way around’ principle | How to determine if switching is possible?| How to determine if a visa allows to work? | Registration with the police | Tuberculosis test | UKBA Staff Guidance

You can find Extracts on the link above too, here are 2 of them:

Extract from the “IMMIGRATION RULES AND HOW TO USE THEM” section:
No one knows everything and remembers all the rules! The trick is to know how to use the Immigration Rules and where to find  the specific information. The Rules may change anytime, and they do change a lot, but if you know how to use the Rules you could check the requirements or check the changes at any time. For example, things like whether a migrant can switch a visa category while in the UK or whether a migrant can work or whether a particular English test is acceptable are all a matter of the Rules, not a matter of guessing.

My ‘Other way around’ principle:
I call it ‘other way around’ because many people tend to think this way: “I am on a Tier 5 visa and want to know if I can apply for a Spouse visa inside the UK”, then they go on the Immigration Rules webpage for the Tier 5 category and try to read the rules there. Understandably, they only find the rules about how to get a Tier 5 visa, which they already have, and not a Spouse visa.

What you need to do is to act the ‘other way around’, ie to check the rules of the category your client is looking to apply for, not the rules of the category in which he/she already has a visa. In our example of switching from a Tier 5 to a Spouse visa it is the Spouse visa rules that one needs to read – to determine if he/she can qualify.

Extracts from the “CRUCIAL TO GET THE BASICS!” section:

What is Switching?
Switchingis not an official term. Switching simply means changing a visa category while inside the UK, ie switching from one to another, such as from a Tier 4 Student to a Tier 2 General; or from Tier 4 to a Spouse visa. Officially it is called ‘applying for a leave to remain in a Tier 2 General category’ or ‘applying for a leave to remain as a Spouse of a UK citizen’. So, we can simply say ‘Switching from a Student visa to a Spouse visa’.

The significance of switching is this: switching means applying inside the UK and it is only allowed if the Rules specifically allow so. If switching is not allowed then the applicant has to return to their country and apply for a visa from there, which means he/she would be applying for an Entry Clearance.

What is the Date of Application and why it is so important?

Imagine this: you are making an application today but tomorrow the Rules are changing, which rules would apply? Or you have made an application a month ago, your visa expires in 2 weeks time and your application is not going to be decided before then, are you going to become an overstayer through no fault of your own?

A Date of Application idea deals with such issues. If the date of your application is before the Rules changed then your application is going to be considered under the Rules in place before the changes. For example, Spouse/Partner visas rules were significantly changed on 9 July 2012, yet those who applied before that, even on 8 July 2012, had their applications considered under the old rules, even if the decision was made a few months after the rules changed.

If the date of your application is before your last visa expired then your status remains the same as it was on the date of application for as long as it takes for a new application to be considered. However long it takes, even if the last visa expired by then. Officially it is extended by virtue of section 3C of the Immigration Act 1971, which automatically extends the ‘last visa’ for as long as it is going to take for a decision on the new application. This means migrants do not become overstayers through no fault of their own?

Monday, 24 November 2014

Can I switch from Tier 2 (Intra-Company Transfer) to a Tier 2 (General) visa inside the UK?

Why would you do that? Because a Tier 2 General visa leads to permanent residency (Indefinite Leave) after 5 years in the UK while most ICT visas don’t lead to an ILR at all.

The answer to our questions is Yes if you meet both requirements below:

1)     You had a Tier 2 ICT Established Staff visa under the Rules in place before 6 April 2011 and after that you extended it inside the UK. A word ‘extended’  is crucial here because those who had an Entry Clearance (outside the UK) at any time from 6 April 2011 can’t switch.

2)     You are applying to change a Sponsor. You can’t switch from ICT to General for the same Sponsor.
What is you can’t switch? Options include: leaving the UK, waiting for 12 months and applying for a Tier 2 General visa, to work for any Sponsor, including the one who sponsored you for an ICT visa at first place. Or to consider switching to a category other than Tier 2, such as a tier 1 Entrepreneur or a Dependant visa if your partner has his/her own Tier 2 visa, for example.

For an individual advice or to make an application please contact us: info@1st4immigration.com or visit www.1st4immigration.com

 If you are an Immigration Adviser or a Solicitor please visit our immigration Training and CPD website: www.1st4immigration.com/training

 

New Tier 1 (General) restrictions after April 2015 - hurry to benefit from the last extensions!

It is with the tears in our eyes that we are seeing off the Tier 1 (General) category, also known as HSMP. Farewell! This category was already closed to the new applicants in April 2011, so until now only extensions were allowed. And until the announcement earlier this year there was no limit on how many extensions a Tier 1 (General) migrant can have. So, it was OK to go and work abroad then come back and extend this visa and then do it again and again – until the time comes to stay for a few years within the limits on absences and get an ILR one day.

Unfortunately, it has been announced earlier this year than last Tier 1 (General) extensions will be accepted on 5 April 2015. So, those who do need an extension should apply before that. And preferably not at the last moment! (OK, OK, we all know it will happen exactly like that). There will be another inevitable rush for same-day service appointments. Our advice is to plan in advance: we offer advice sessions now, over email or at our office (if over email we respond by the end of the next working day).
 
And advice session would help clarify the requirements and decide on the strategy: when to extend and what’s next. We can then help with an application when the time comes (but before 5 April 2015).
 
Furthermore, last Indefinite Leave applications (ILR, permanent residency), which are based on the Tier 1 (General) route, will be in April 2018. Those who  can’t qualify for an ILR by then won’t be able to do it at all.
 
The only way after 5 April 2018 would be to switch to another category which leads to an ILR. Preferably, a category that can be combined with the time spent on Tier 1 (General). We could also advise this at an advice session and we advise to plan in advance, ie ‘now’.
 
For example, a popular suggestion of switching to a Tier 1 (Entrepreneur) visa is not ideal because time spent on an Entrepreneur visa cannot be combined with the time spent on Tier 1 (General).
 
For an individual advice or to make an application please contact us: info@1st4immigration.com or visit www.1st4immigration.com
 If you are an Immigration Adviser or a Solicitor please visit our immigration Training and CPD website: www.1st4immigration.com/training

Wednesday, 19 November 2014

OISC Level 1 course, Sat-Sun 6-7 December, City of London (Monument), from a practicing immigration company. Plus date for the next 6 months - we have training every month.

2-day weekend courses, every month, at our office in the City of London. Multi Travel Visas Ltd and a sister company, 1st 4Immigration Ltd, are both accredited by The OISC, ref F201100418 and F200800152 respectively. After many years of experience – and hundreds of successful cases – we are offering to share our experience with you to help you prepare for your OISC Level 1 assessment and accreditation. You can read Testimonials on our immigration cases here.
TRAINING DATES (we have a class every month):

Weekend 6 - 7 December 2014 – book now!

Weekend 31 January - 1 February 2015

Weekend 28 February - 1 March 2015

Weekend 21 - 22 March 2015

Weekend 11 - 12 April 2015

Weekend 16 - 17 May 2015

Weekend 27 - 28 June 2015


Our tutors are our very own OISC-accredited practicing immigration advisers who handle the real cases during the week and teach on weekends. You can read about them on the Tutors page.

Unlike most traditional courses, ours is conducted using plain language and does not simply contain quotes from the Immigration Rules. We include cases studies from our practice, answers to most common questions, a Questions&Answers session and a mock Level 1 assessment, which is given to the candidates at the end to complete in their own time and send to us. Generally, we try to keep it as entertaining as possible. We will also provide a printed version of the course (150 pages) for you to take home, which is very detailed, contains more cases studies and you can take it with you to the 'real' OISC exam.

To book visit our training website: http://www.mtv-training.co.uk/

Detailed Course Agenda can be found here and is designed in our own unique way.



Online OISC Level 1 course (as opposed to classroom training): you can instantly download from this link and study in your own time.

Multi Travel Visas Ltd: 68 King William Street, City of London, London, EC4N 7DZ. Near Monument underground station. Email: info@mtv-training.co.uk , Phone: 0871 472 1468 (£0.10 per minute, emails are free).
 
_________________________________________________________________________________
You can find a detailed Table of Contents on the link above, here are 2 examples (of 20):

PART 1: CRUCIAL TO GET THE BASICS!2 systems of immigration law: UK law and European law | Types of visas under the UK law | Entry Clearance | Visitor visa | Leave to Remain (also called Residence Permit or Limited Leave to Remain) | Indefinite Leave to Remain (ILR) | It is possible to lose an ILR, however Indefinite it is | Indefinite Leave to Enter | There is also a Leave to Enter
Settlement’ and 2 confusing meanings of this word | Common question:  Passport has expired, do I have to transfer my visa to a new passport | What is Switching? | Common examples when switching is not allowed even though the migrants are desperate to do so | What is the Date of Application and why it is so important? | When is the Date of Application? | In-time and Out-of-time applications

PART 2: IMMIGRATION RULES AND HOW TO USE THEM
Each category rules consist of 3 parts | My ‘Other way around’ principle | How to determine if switching is possible?| How to determine if a visa allows to work? | Registration with the police | Tuberculosis test | UKBA Staff Guidance

You can find Extracts on the link above too, here are 2 of them:

Extract from the “IMMIGRATION RULES AND HOW TO USE THEM” section:
No one knows everything and remembers all the rules! The trick is to know how to use the Immigration Rules and where to find  the specific information. The Rules may change anytime, and they do change a lot, but if you know how to use the Rules you could check the requirements or check the changes at any time. For example, things like whether a migrant can switch a visa category while in the UK or whether a migrant can work or whether a particular English test is acceptable are all a matter of the Rules, not a matter of guessing.

My ‘Other way around’ principle:
I call it ‘other way around’ because many people tend to think this way: “I am on a Tier 5 visa and want to know if I can apply for a Spouse visa inside the UK”, then they go on the Immigration Rules webpage for the Tier 5 category and try to read the rules there. Understandably, they only find the rules about how to get a Tier 5 visa, which they already have, and not a Spouse visa.

What you need to do is to act the ‘other way around’, ie to check the rules of the category your client is looking to apply for, not the rules of the category in which he/she already has a visa. In our example of switching from a Tier 5 to a Spouse visa it is the Spouse visa rules that one needs to read – to determine if he/she can qualify.

Extracts from the “CRUCIAL TO GET THE BASICS!” section:

What is Switching?
Switchingis not an official term. Switching simply means changing a visa category while inside the UK, ie switching from one to another, such as from a Tier 4 Student to a Tier 2 General; or from Tier 4 to a Spouse visa. Officially it is called ‘applying for a leave to remain in a Tier 2 General category’ or ‘applying for a leave to remain as a Spouse of a UK citizen’. So, we can simply say ‘Switching from a Student visa to a Spouse visa’.

The significance of switching is this: switching means applying inside the UK and it is only allowed if the Rules specifically allow so. If switching is not allowed then the applicant has to return to their country and apply for a visa from there, which means he/she would be applying for an Entry Clearance.

What is the Date of Application and why it is so important?

Imagine this: you are making an application today but tomorrow the Rules are changing, which rules would apply? Or you have made an application a month ago, your visa expires in 2 weeks time and your application is not going to be decided before then, are you going to become an overstayer through no fault of your own?

A Date of Application idea deals with such issues. If the date of your application is before the Rules changed then your application is going to be considered under the Rules in place before the changes. For example, Spouse/Partner visas rules were significantly changed on 9 July 2012, yet those who applied before that, even on 8 July 2012, had their applications considered under the old rules, even if the decision was made a few months after the rules changed.

If the date of your application is before your last visa expired then your status remains the same as it was on the date of application for as long as it takes for a new application to be considered. However long it takes, even if the last visa expired by then. Officially it is extended by virtue of section 3C of the Immigration Act 1971, which automatically extends the ‘last visa’ for as long as it is going to take for a decision on the new application. This means migrants do not become overstayers through no fault of their own?

Tuesday, 18 November 2014

New testimonial on our UK Passport renewal 1 week service.

“Thank you for your very helpful and efficient service, it was very much appreciated and it was nice to get a personal service for a change.  Would have no hesitation in recommending your company.  Once again many thanks.”

This came from Karen who used our 1 week British passport renewal service. Yes, Karen, we agree, it is always nice to get a personal service these days, when it is becoming more of a rarity. And we like offering it!
When same-day service is not available, a one week service is a good alternative. For example, if your passport was lost or stolen or if it is a child’s first passport. 1 week service is also available to everyone renewing their passports as a cheaper alternative to same-day service, yet still with the processing time which can be accurately estimated.  


Phone 0871 472 1468 or 07795471483
Email: info@multitravelvisas.co.uk  We reply on the same working day!

Or come to our office from 9am to 6pm (you don’t need an appointment): 68 King William Street, City of London, London, EC4N 7DZ. We’re near Monument tube station, close to Bank and Liverpool Street, over the bridge from London Bridge station and within easy reach by DLR from Canary Wharf.
 

New testimonial on our Saudi Arabian visa service.

“Thanks, I have received my passport on time, Appreciate your excellent Service and Advice.” This came from Noufal, a British national.  It is possible to obtain a Saudi business visa within 3-4 working days.  


Phone 0871 472 1468 or 07795471483
Email: info@multitravelvisas.co.uk  We reply on the same working day!

Or come to our office from 9am to 6pm (you don’t need an appointment): 68 King William Street, City of London, London, EC4N 7DZ. We’re near Monument tube station, close to Bank and Liverpool Street, over the bridge from London Bridge station and within easy reach by DLR from Canary Wharf.

 

 

Friday, 14 November 2014

Tier 2 Sponsor Licence process

Sponsor Licence is the 1st step in the process of employing the non-EU workers. Sponsor, such as an Employer, must have a Tier 2 or Tier 5 Sponsor Licence from the UK Home Office. If employer does not have such a Licence then the company can apply for it and our company can help with the application. Very often a company is happy to hire a worker who comes to us for an advice and are willing to apply for a Sponsor Licence and comply with the rest of the Sponsor’s duties, especially if the job is very skilled or on Shortage Occupation List.

Once the company has a Sponsor licence, it will be placed on the Register of Sponsors (Employers) on the UKVI website and will have access to the Sponsor Management System, known as SMS. A licence can be just for one category, for example, Tier 2 General or can be for more than one type, such as Tier 2 General and Tier 2 Intra-Company Transfer.

Sponsor Licence is issued for the company, it is not connected to a migrant (not connected to a specific employee). A licence is, in general, for the company to sponsor non-EU nationals.

Once the licence has been issued, an employer can proceed to the 2nd step. An authorised person from the company can log in to Sponsor Management System (SMS) on the UKVI website and assign a Certificate of Sponsorship (COS).  A COS relates to a specific migrant.

In case of Intra-Company Transfer, Minister of Religion and Sportsperson a Sponsor can login into SMS and assign a COS. In case of Tier 2 General there are 2 types of certificates: restricted and unrestricted. 

Once a COS has been assigned, a migrant can finally apply for a Tier 2 or Tier 5 visa, which is the 3rd step in the process of securing a work visa. More on Tier 2 visas can be found on the Tier 2 Work Permit page.

Our company can help with applying for a Sponsor Licence, including when a licence is needed urgently, such as when the migrant’s current UK visa is about to expire. Our ‘record’ is 3 working days from the point of submission to the Home Office, although we cannot guarantee it in each case!

The process is heavily based on submitting the right documents about the Sponsor (the company). The documents themselves are quire logical, every active and genuine company in the UK would have most of them or can request them from the relevant authorities. However, the main problem the companies find (and while their applications end up being refused) is not the documents but the details on the documents and especially, the format of the documents. Most common problem is the electronic documents, which are normally not accepted by the UKVI.

For help with the Sponsor Licence please contact us: info@1st4immigration.com

Interesting case study: Spouse visa for a New Zealand spouse of a dual British/Irish citizen who tried to apply under EEA law but was refused because of the changes in the EEA Regulations on dual nationals.

This was a very interesting case! This couple came to us for a advice, following a refusal of an application for an EEA Residence Card. The applicant is from New Zealand and the Sponsor is a dual British/Irish national. The application was made in early 2014, ie after the changes in the EEA Regulations for dual UK/EU nationals (which happened on 16 July 2012).

Before 16 July 2012 dual UK/EU nationals could simply choose whether to use their British nationality to bring their non-EU spouses to the UK and apply under the Immigration Rules. Or to use EEA nationality (non-UK) and apply under the EEA Regulations. Before 9 July 2012, when Appendix FM came in force, it did make sense to use the Immigration Rules because a foreign spouse could have an ILR just after 2 years. From 9 July 2012 there is a strict Financial Requirement as well as a qualifying period for an ILR now being 5 years.

So, the Immigration Rules were changed on 9 July 2012 while EEA Regulations were changed shortly after – on 16 July 2012. At the moment it is way more advantageous to use the EEA route: no Financial Requirement, no English, a Residence Card is for the whole 5 years (not 2.5+2.5) and the cost is so much lower. So, the option of a ‘choice’ has now been stopped, save for Transitional Arrangements (which are not a matter of this course).

So, the New Zealander wife came to the UK as a visitor, got her 6 months stamp on arrival and then applied for a Residence Card on EEA2 form. The application was (rightly) refused. The Irish/British spouse has not qualified under the Surinder Singh route, ie he had not worked in Ireland or another EU member state immediately before returning to the UK (in fact he has never worked in Ireland), so the spouse could not benefit from the EU law. This is when the couple came to us for an advice.

We explained about the changes for dual nationals and advised to return to New Zealand and apply for an Entry Clearance as a Spouse of a UK citizen under the Appendix FM. Unless of course they choose to go and live in another EU member state first, with the British national working or being self-employed there, and then come back. Initially, the clients were very keen on appeal and generally, on ‘fighting the system’, including trying to claim insurmountable circumstances and using EX.1 and EX.2 paragraphs under the Appendix FM. In the end, they decided to apply for an Entry Clearance.

Once we were following the Rules in Appendix FM, the applicant was within the Rules and the case became straightforward. Even the Financial Requirement was straightforward because the Sponsor has already worked in the UK for 6 months for the same employer while the spouse was waiting for the outcome of the Residence Card application. The application was submitted using Priory service in New Zealand and was approved after just 1 week.
 
For those interested in the Surinder Singh route please visit our earlier post: http://1st4immigration-visas.blogspot.co.uk/2014/10/surinder-singh-route-for-spouses-and.html   
 
 
Also, there are some transitional arrangements for dual nationals, which can be summed up as applicable to those who had a document confirming a right to reside in the UK on 16 July and 16 October 2012 and to those who had achieved a status of a permanent resident before 16 July 2012.

For an individual advice or to make your application as successful please contact us: info@1st4immigration.com , we reply on the same working day. Or visit www.1st4immigration.com
 
If you are an Immigration Adviser or a Solicitor please visit our immigration Training and CPD website: www.1st4immigration.com/training

 

Thursday, 13 November 2014

New successful case and testimonial on a Tier 2 (General) work visa for an Indian national switching from Tier 4 Student visa after securing sponsorship from employer who had a Sponsor Licence.

“I would like to say a big thank you to Ms Lucy for all your help and assistance with my Tier-2 visa application. You helped and guided me very well through the whole process and assured me even when there were delays. You were very prompt with your replies. Thank you once again for all your help and assistance. I will definitely recommend my friends and family who will be needing this kind of service to hire you.​”
 
This came from Jasmeet, an Indian national who completed a degree at a UK university and  secured a certificate of sponsorship from a company with a Tier 2 Sponsor licence. Jasmeet made her initial application earlier but it was refused because of the salary requirements. So when Jasmeet asked us to help with the subsequent application, we made sure the appropriate salary requirement was met. Namely, that a salary as on the chosen SOC code on Tier 2 Code of Practice was corresponding to the salary offered to the applicant (or pro-rated, as the case was and as the case is in most applications).
 
The minimum salary under Tier 2 is £20,500 and it is very confusing – because the actual minimum for the applicant is based on the chosen SOC code from the Code of Practice, which is higher than £20,500 in most cases.

We have an earlier post here, which provides more on the salary calculation:  http://1st4immigration-visas.blogspot.co.uk/2014/11/whats-minimum-salary-for-tier-2-general.html
 
For an individual advice or to make your application as successful please contact us: info@1st4immigration.com , we reply on the same working day. Or visit www.1st4immigration.com
 
If you are an Immigration Adviser or a Solicitor please visit our immigration Training and CPD website: www.1st4immigration.com/training

 

 

 

 

 

What’s the minimum salary for Tier 2 General visa? £20,500 or as on the Code of Practice?

We are asked this question a lot as requirements seem to be confusing.

Firstly, there is currently a minimum salary of £20,500 from 6 April 2014. This is just a minimum, so all Tier 2 General applicants must be offered at least that but it does not end there!

Secondly – and very importantly as it’s a common reason for refusals – at the same time the minimum salary must be as on the Tier 2 Code of Practice or on a Shortage Occupation List.

For example, if your occupation requires a minimum salary of £19,000 then you must be still offered at least £20,500 to qualify, otherwise your application will be refused. However, if your occupation requires a minimum of, say, £25,000 then you must be offered minimum £25,000 (and not £20,500). If you are offered less than £25,000 in this example then your application will be refused because your salary is not as on the Code of Practice, even if it is £20,500.

If your employer cannot afford to pay £25,000 (in this example) then they can reduce a number of hours you work, on a pro-rated basis (but with enough hours for an annual pay of £20,500).

For example, your occupation requires a salary of £30,000 for a 39-hour working week (the current Code of Practice is based on 39 hours per week, unlike the old one which was based on 37.5 hours). So, pay per hour would be: £30,000 / 52 (weeks in a year) / 39 (hours per week) = £14.80. The minimum pay for a Tier 2 General visa is £20,500 per annum, so we need enough hours to achieve £20,500 per year. In this example it would be minimum 27 hours per week: 27 x £14.80 per hour x 52 = £20,779.20. It is above the minimum £20,500 and meets the Code of Practice requirement of paying minimum £30,000 for a 39-hour week. It is the same salary per hour, just working fewer hours.

A number of working hours will be stated on your Certificate of Sponsorship (COS), so the UK Visas & Immigration does not have to guess. You have to ensure your employer knows that! From our experience many HR managers just put some standard salary amount for some standard (for their company) number of working hours per week and then it turns out to be not enough when we compare it with the Code of Practice. It is you, the migrant, who will have a problem when applying for a Tier 2 visa, not your employer. If your employer gets it wrong then your COS will become obsolete and your employer will have to issue you with another COS. Our strong advice – discuss this with your employer BEFORE they assign your COS!

Please remember: if your job is from Shortage Occupation List then minimum number of hours must be 30 hours per week!

Finally, there is a new salary category from 6 April 2013: Entry Level, which is a lower amount of pay for the people who are applying under Tier 2 category for the 1st time AND are under 25 years old. Entry Level can also be used  for all applicants who are switching from Tier 1 Post-Study Work or Tier 4 visas. Some of these Entry salary levels may be less than £20,500, however, the minimum must still be £20,500 per year. It means you must be either offered more than an Entry Level or your COS must specify more hours in order to take your pay to a total of £20,500. Just cannot end up working too much – the UKVI allows max 48 hours per week.

If you are not eligible for Entry Level salary then your employer must offer an Experienced level.

For more advice or to make an application, including on same-day service in Croydon, please contact us: info@1st4immigration.com or visit www.1st4immigration.com

If you are an Immigration Adviser or a Solicitor please visit our CDP training website: www.1st4immigration.com/training

 

Tuesday, 11 November 2014

Do I need English in Speaking and Listening only when the test covers all 4 components including Reading and Writing?

For a Spouse/Partner/Fiancée visas, the Immigration Rules say only Speaking and Listening need to be demonstrated at the required level, however, many approved tests cover all 4 components including Reading and Writing. What to do?

Until approx August 2014 the approach was, as was confirmed to us by the UKVI policy department, to look at the overall score at the required level, such as A1 for spouses/partners/fiancées and B1 for and ILR. IELTS would be a good example.

Now, however, the Rules have been clarified, once again, and it is OK just to look at the Speaking and Listening components, even if the applicant has not passed Reading or Writing.

If a test provides Speaking and Listening testing only, without the rest, then you can use it. ESOL would be a good example as most other acceptable tests.

For an individual advice or to make an application please contact us: info@1st4immigration.com or visit www.1st4immigration.com
 

If you are an Immigration Adviser or a Solicitor please visit our Immigration Training and CPD website: www.1st4immigration.com/training

 

 

 

Monday, 10 November 2014

OISC Level 1 course, Sat-Sun 6-7 December, City of London (Monument), from a practicing immigration company

This is a 2-day weekend course at our office in the City of London. Multi Travel Visas Ltd and a sister company, 1st 4Immigration Ltd, are both accredited by The OISC, ref F201100418 and F200800152 respectively. After many years of experience – and hundreds of successful cases – we are offering to share our experience with you to help you prepare for your OISC Level 1 assessment and accreditation. You can read Testimonials on our immigration cases here.

Our tutors are our very own OISC-accredited practicing immigration advisers who handle the real cases during the week and teach on weekends. You can read about them on the Tutors page.
 
Unlike most traditional courses, ours is conducted using plain language and does not simply contain quotes from the Immigration Rules. We include cases studies from our practice, answers to most common questions, a Questions&Answers session and a mock Level 1 assessment, which is given to the candidates at the end to complete in their own time and send to us. Generally, we try to keep it as entertaining as possible. We will also provide a printed version of the course (150 pages) for you to take home, which is very detailed, contains more cases studies and you can take it with you to the 'real' OISC exam.
 
To book visit our training website: http://www.mtv-training.co.uk/
 
Detailed Course Agenda can be found here and is designed in our own unique way.


Online OISC Level 1 course (as opposed to classroom training): you can instantly download from this link and study in your own time.

Multi Travel Visas Ltd: 68 King William Street, City of London, London, EC4N 7DZ. Near Monument underground station. Email: info@mtv-training.co.uk , Phone: 0871 472 1468 (£0.10 per minute, emails are free).